California Institute of
Technology
Gordon & Betty Moore Professor
of Engineering & Applied Science, Emeritus
Contact: Donna L. Fox Email: dfox@caltech.edu
Phone: 626.395.2812

Teaching

EE 4, 1970-71, Introduction to Digital Electronics. Circuits were designed on the blackboard, wired together, and debugged in class.

     = courses started by Carver Mead

1958-1959

EE 290
Topics in Solid State Devices and Circuits
Prerequisite: EE 190 ab. Advanced seminar in solid state devices and circuits. A term paper will be required. Instructors: Middlebrook, Mead.
EE 190 c
Transistor bias methods and use in D.C. low-frequency and high-frequency amplifiers; power amplifiers; oscillators, switching circuits; regulators. Associated analysis, synthesis, and problems. Text: An Introduction to Junction Transistor Theory, Middlebrook. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Winter

1959-1960

EE 190 c
Transistor bias methods and use in D.C. low-frequency and high-frequency amplifiers; power amplifiers; oscillators, switching circuits; regulators. Associated analysis, synthesis, and problems. Text: An Introduction to Junction Transistor Theory, Middlebrook. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Spring
EE 290
Topics in Solid State Devices and Circuits
Prerequisite: EE 190 ab. Advanced seminar in solid state devices and circuits. A term paper will be required. Instructors: Middlebrook, Mead.

1960-1961

EE 106 ab
Electronic Circuits
Resistive diode circuits; rectifiers. Piecewise linear and incremental analysis of vacuum tubes and transistors. Power amplifiers: Class A and B. Electromechanical analogs: loudspeakers. Regulators. Waveshaping; multivibrators. Negative resistance and sinusoidal oscillators. Modulation and demodulation; AM and FM. Prerequisite: EE 1 ab. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter

1961-1962

EE 106 ab
Electronic Circuits
Prerequisite: EE 1 abc. Resistive diode circuits; rectifiers. Piecewise linear and incremental analysis of vacuum tubes and transistors. Power amplifiers: Class A and B. Electromechanical analogs: loudspeakers. Regulators. Waveshaping; multivibrators. Negative resistance and sinusoidal oscillators. Modulation and demodulation; AM and FM. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter

1962-1963

EE 106 ab
Electronic Circuits
Prerequisite: EE 1 abc. A course covering the general areas of nonlinear electronics. Diode circuits, rectifiers, clippers, clamps, mixers. Transistor and vacuum tube amplifiers treated from the equivalent circuit point of view; biasing, gain, frequency response, class A, B, and C power output and limitations. Transistor switching, saturation, power converters, transistor choppers, direct coupled transistor logic. Oscillators; relaxation and harmonic, using 3 terminal and negative resistance devices. Modulation (AM and FM) methods. Texts: Transistor Circuit Analysis, Joyce and Clarke; Electronic and Radio Engineering, Terman. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter

1963-1964

EE 7 abc
Experimental Techniques in Electrical Engineering
A general laboratory program designed primarily to prepare the student to participate in current experimental research in the fields of electrical engineering and physical electronics. Emphasis is placed not only upon careful laboratory procedure, but also upon selection of significant projects and interpretation of data. Formal laboratory experiments are available for students whose experimental background is insufficient to permit them to carry on original work. Text: Literature references. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-2 Fall
Winter
Spring
EE 106 ab
Electronic Circuits
Prerequisite: EE 1 abc. A course covering the general areas of nonlinear electronics. Diode circuits, rectifiers, clippers, clamps, mixers. Transistor and vacuum tube amplifiers treated from the equivalent circuit point of view; biasing, gain, frequency response, class A, B, and C power output and limitations. Transistor switching, saturation, power converters, transistor choppers, direct coupled transistor logic. Oscillators; relaxation and harmonic, using 3 terminal and negative resistance devices. Modulation (AM and FM) methods. Texts: Transistor Circuit Analysis, Joyce and Clarke; Electronic and Radio Engineering, Terman. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
EE 195 abc
Electronic Processes in Solids
Prerequisite: EE 162 or equivalent. A treatment of topics in the field of applied solid-state physics relating to the current research activities of the staff. Topics to be covered in detail include superconductivity, ferromagnetism, semiconductors and hot electron transport in insulators and metals. Instructors: Mason, Nicolet, Mead, Wilts.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1964-1965

EE 20 abc
Physics of Electronic Devices
Prerequisite: Ph 2 abc. The application of modern physical principles to materials and devices important in present technological applications. Topics include: energy bands in solids, electrical properties of semiconductors, metals and dielectrics, semiconductor devices, plasmas, gas tubes, excitation and relaxation of electronic systems with reference to luminescence and stimulated emission. Text: Solid State Physical Electronics, Van Der Ziel. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring
EE 135 abc (Formerly EE 195 abc)
Electronic Processes in Solids
Prerequisite: EE 20 or equivalent. A treatment of topics in the field of applied solid-state physics relating to the current research activities of the staff. Topics to be covered in detail include superconductivity, ferromagnetism, semiconductors and hot electron transport in insulators and metals. Instructors: Nicolet, Mead, Wilts.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1965-1966

EE 20 abc
Physics of Electronic Devices
Prerequisite: Ph 2 abc. The application of modern physical principles to materials and devices important in present technological applications. Topics include: energy bands in solids, electrical properties of semiconductors, metals and dielectrics, semiconductor devices, plasmas, gas tubes, excitation and relaxation of electronic systems and reference to luminescence and stimulated emission. Text: Solid State Physical Electronics, Van Der Ziel. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring
EE 135 abc
Electronic Processes in Solids
Prerequisite: EE 20 or equivalent. A treatment of topics in the field of applied solid-state physics relating to the current research activities of the staff. Topics to be covered in detail include superconductivity, ferromagnetism, semiconductors and hot electron transport in insulators and metals. Instructors: Nicolet, Mead, Wilts.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1966-1967

EE 20 abc
Physics of Electronic Devices
Prerequisite: Ph 2 abc. The application of modern physical principles to materials and devices important in present technological applications. Topics include: energy bands in solids, electrical properties of semiconductors, metals and dielectrics, semiconductor devices, plasmas, gas tubes, excitation and relaxation of electronic systems and reference to luminescence and stimulated emission. Text: Solid State Physical Electronics, Van Der Ziel. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1968-1969

EE 3
Introduction to Solid State Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts of modern electronic devices such as diodes, junction and field effect transistors, controlled rectifiers, etc. Topics will include: conductors, energy barriers, junctions, and rectification. The operating principles of transistors and transistor-like devices. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-2 Fall
EE 9
Solid State Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite: EE 3. An introductory laboratory designed to illustrate the principles of modern electronic devices and modern electronic instrumentation. Experiments are designed to cover the range of sophistication from the fairly simple devices such as resistors or diodes to more complicated concepts such as the Hall Effect and drift-mobility. The student is afforded the opportunity of using a wide variety of modern electronic instruments including the campus-wide Citran computer system. Instructors: Mead, Humphrey.
1-3-2 Winter

1970-1971

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 5
Introduction to Linear Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts of modern linear electronic circuitry. AC circuit analysis; networks and their characterization in frequency and time domain. Amplifier, gain, frequency response. The use of operational amplifier to synthesize function of input variables. Power, dynamic range and the design of power output amplifiers. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Spring
EE 131 abc
Physics of Semiconductors and Semiconductor Devices
Introduction to the concepts of semiconductor devices. Includes topics such as the solid state, electric properties of solids, Boltzmann and Fermi statistics, properties of regular arrays, band theory of crystals, electrons, holes, semiconductors, theory of p-n junctions and of semiconductor devices. Instructors: Mayer, McCaldin, and Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1971-1972

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 5
Introduction to Linear Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts of modern linear e!ectronic circuitry. AC circuit analysis; networks and their characterization in frequency and time domain. Amplifier, gain, frequency response. The use of operational amplifier to synthesize function of input variables. Power, dynamic range and the design of power output amplifiers. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Spring
EE 10
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite: EE 4. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory nonstructured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Admission by approval of project proposal. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
EE 281
Semiconductor Devices
Prerequisite: APh 181 ab, its equivalent. or instructor's permission. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of semiconductor devices. Emphasis is placed on the engineering approach. The devices discussed will range from the simple diode to complex multijunction devices employed in integrated circuits. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall

1972-1973

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 5
Introduction to Linear Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts of modern linear electronic circuitry. AC circuit analysis; networks and their characterization in frequency and time domain. Amplifier, gain, frequency response. The use of operational amplifier to synthesize function of input variables. Power, dynamic range and the design of power output amplifiers. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Spring
EE 10
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite: EE 4. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory non-structured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Admission by approval of project proposal. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
EE 281
Semiconductor Devices
Prerequisite APh 181 ab, its equivalent, or instructor's permission. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on the engineering approach. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1973-1974

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 10
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite: EE 4 and approval of project proposal. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory non-structured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
EE 112 abc
Network Synthesis
Prerequisite: AM 95 abc. Passive network analysis and synthesis, feedback amplifiers, closed loop transfer functions, active filters. Sample data systems, digital/linear delay functions, digital filters, and digital signal processing. Second and third terms seminar format, requires extensive student participation. Instructors: Martel, Mead, Wilts.
2-0-7 Fall
Winter
Spring
EE 281 abc
Semiconductor Devices
Prerequisite: APh 181 ab, its equivalent, or instructor's permission. An advanced graduate course is the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on the engineering approach. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1974-1975

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 10
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite: EE 4 and approval of project proposal. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory non-structured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
EE 112 abc
Network Synthesis
Prerequisite: AM 95 abc. Passive network analysis and synthesis, feedback amplifiers, closed loop transfer functions, active filters. Sample data systems, digital/linear delay functions, digital filters, and digital signal processing. Second and third terms seminar format, requires extensive student participation. Instructors: Martel, Mead, Wilts.
2-0-7 Fall
Winter
Spring
EE 281 abc
Semiconductor Devices
Prerequisite: APh 181 ab, its equivalent, or instructor's permission. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on the engineering approach. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1975-1976

EE 4
Introduction to Digital Electronics
An introduction to the significant concepts and techniques of modern digital integrated electronic circuitry. The formulation of logical equations and their realization in hardware. Binary arithmetic and its implementation with logical functions. The course concludes with the design and construction of a simple digital computer. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Winter
EE 10
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisites: EE 4 and approval of project proposal. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory non-structured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
EE 281 abc
Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisite: Proficiency in semiconductor device physics, circuit design, and logic design. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on the realization of system functions in large-scale integrated circuits. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1976-1977

CS/EE 11
Digital Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisites. CS/EE 4 and approval of project proposal. 6 units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. An introductory non-structured project laboratory designed to provide an opportunity for projects related to the course CS/EE 4. The student is expected to design, build, and test his own digital system. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Mead.
0-3-3 Spring
CS/EE 281 abc
Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisite: Proficiency in semiconductor device physics, circuit design, and logic design. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis on system realization in VLSI. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1977-1978

CS 10 ab
Introduction to Computing
State machines, stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, assemblers, compilers and high-level programming language. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Fall
Winter
CS/EE 281 abc
Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisite: Proficiency in semiconductor device physics, circuit design, and logic design. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis on system realization in VLSI. Instructor: Mead.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1978-1979

CS 10
Introduction to Computing
State machines, stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, assemblers, compilers and high-level programming language. Instructor: Mead.
2-0-4 Spring
CS/EE 281 abc
Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisite: proficiency in semiconductor device physics, circuit design, and logic design. An advanced graduate course in the physics, design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis on system realization in VLSI. Instructor: Mead.
3-6-3 Fall
Winter
Spring

1980-1981

CS/EE 181 abc
Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisite: proficiency in semiconductor device physics. circuit design, and logic design. An advanced course in the design, production, and use of large-scale integrated circuits. Emphasis on system realization in VLSI. Instructors: Mead, Seitz.
3-3-6 Fall
Winter
Spring

1981-1982

Bi/CS/Ph 250 abc
The Physics of Computation
Prerequisite: Knowledge of at least one of the relevant fields and willingness to learn the others. Computation is a physical process or "behavior" carried out through the operation of the laws of physics on a very complex system. Common physical principles of computation emerge in the microphysics of computational devices-whether gate, Josephsen junction, neuron, or enzyme. When large numbers of simple devices are made into a computer or nervous system capable of large-scale parallel processing, new physical problems arise such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, evolution, building or growth of the system; and new collective phenomena emerge. Rather than ions or electrons, we find errors, coding, stability, data structures, and languages. The course will describe the physics of computation in a broad context ranging from biology to device physics, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. In addition, the course format will require each student to report in class on a result from the literature, and participate in discussions. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield, Feynman.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring
CS/EE 186 abc
VLSI Design Laboratory
Prerequisite: CS/EE 181 (may be taken concurrently). A laboratory emphasizing the design of Very Large Scale Integrated digital systems. Each student is required, by the end of the first term, to produce a complete design of a project of his or her own devising. Chips embodying these projects are fabricated and made available for test during the second term. A few large-scale designs are undertaken during the last two terms by members of several design teams. Participants are required to use well-defined design principles, disciplines, and synthesis techniques as part of the project execution. Instructor: Mead.
0-6-3 Fall
Winter
Spring

1982-1983

Bi/CS/Ph 250 abc
The Physics of Computation
Prerequisite: Knowledge of at least one of the relevant fields and willingness to learn the others. Computation is a physical process or "behavior" carried out through the operation of the laws of physics on a very complex system. Common physical principles of computation emerge in the microphysics of computational devices-whether gate, Josephsen junction, neuron, or enzyme.

When large numbers of simple devices are made into a computer or nervous system capable of large-scale parallel processing, new physical problems arise such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, evolution, building or growth of the system; and new collective phenomena emerge. Rather than ions or electrons, we fmd errors, coding, stability, data structures, and languages. The course will describe the physics of computation in a broad context ranging from biology to device physics, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. In addition, the course format will require each student to report in class on a result from the literature, and participate in discussions. Graded pass/fail. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield, Feynman.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring
Bi/CS/Ph 250 abc
The Physics of Computation
Prerequisite: Knowledge of at least one of the relevant fields and willingness to learn the others. The course will describe the physics of computation in a broad context ranging from biology to device physics, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. A more detailed course description will be found under the Biology option. Graded pass/fail. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield, Feynman.
3-0-6 Fall
Winter
Spring
CS 10
Introduction to Computing
State machines, stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, and high-level programming. Laboratory involves programming on personal computers in PASCAL. Students will be expected to become familiar with PASCAL and structured programming methodology. Three units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. Instructor: Mead.
2-3-4 Fall
Winter
Spring

1983-1984

Bi/CS/Ph 250 abc
The Physics of Computation
Completion of undergraduate requirements for Computer Science, Physics, or Applied Physics, or equivalent quantitative background. Computation is a physical process or behavior carried out through the operation of the laws of physics on a very complex system. Common physical principles of computation emerge in the microphysics of computational devices whether transistor circuit or neuron. New physical problems arise with large-scale parallel systems such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, evolution, building, or growth of the system; and new collective phenomena emerge. Questions of errors, coding, stability, data structures, and languages cannot be separated from the device physics in large-scale and highly parallel systems. The course will describe the computation in a context ranging from device physics to biology, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. It will build toward the modeling, design and fabrication of circuits relevant to extensive parallel and collective computation. The course format will require each student to undertake a design project and participate in discussions. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
2-4-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CS 10
Introduction to Computing
State machines, stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, and high-level programming. Laboratory involves programming on personal computers in PASCAL. Students will be expected to become familiar with PASCAL and structured programming methodology. Three units credit allowed toward freshman laboratory requirement. Instructor: Mead.
2-3-4 Spring

1984-1985

CS 10
Introduction to Computing
State machines, stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, and high-level programming. Laboratory involves programming on personal computers in PASCAL. Students will be expected to become familiar with PASCAL and structured programming methodology. Instructor: Mead.
2-3-4 Spring
Bi/CS/Ph 185
Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate requirements for CS, physics or applied physics, or equivalent quantitative background. New physical problems arise with large-scale parallel systems such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, and new collective phenomena emerge. The course will describe the computation in a context ranging from device physics to biology, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. It will build toward the modeling, design and fabrication of circuits relevant to extensive parallel and collective computation. The course format will require each student to undertake a design or other project and participate in discussions. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
2-4-3 Fall
CS/Ph 186 ab
Experimental Projects in Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Bi/CS/Ph 185. Projects course dealing with various aspects of collective computation as covered in Bi/CS/Ph 185. A completed project and report are required. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
0-9-0 Winter
Spring

1985-1986

CS 10
Introduction to Computing
Stored program machines, control structures, modular program design, symbolic control and data manipulation, data structures recursion, and high-level programming. Laboratory involves programming on personal computers in PASCAL. Students will be expected to become familiar with PASCAL and structured programming methodology. Instructor: Mead.
2-3-4 Spring
Bi/CS/Ph 185
Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate requirements for CS, physics or applied physics, or equivalent quantitative background. New physical problems arise with large-scale parallel systems such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, and new collective phenomena emerge. The course describes the computation in a context ranging from device physics to biology, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. It will build toward the modeling, design, and fabrication of circuits relevant to extensive parallel and collective computation. Each student must undertake a design or other project and participate in discussions. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
2-4-3 Fall
CS/Ph 186 ab
Experimental Projects in Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Bi/CS/Ph 185. Projects course dealing with various aspects of collective computation as covered in Bi/CS/Ph 185. A completed project and report are required. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
3-0-6 Winter
Spring

1986-1987

Bi/CS/Ph 185
Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate requirements for CS, physics or applied physics. or equivalent quantitative background. New physical problems arise with large-scale parallel systems such as the meaning of time order or simultaneity; new logistical/physical problems dominate the design, and new collective phenomena emerge. The course describes the computation in a context ranging from device physics to biology, and from elementary logic devices to concepts in complexity. It will build toward the modeling, design, and fabrication of circuits relevant to extensive parallel and collective computation. Each student must undertake a design or other project and participate in discussions. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
2-4-3 Winter
CS/Ph 186 ab
Experimental Projects in Collective Computation
Prerequisite: Bi/CS/Ph 185. Projects course dealing with various aspects of collective computation as covered in Bi/CS/Ph 185. A completed project and report are required. Instructors: Mead, Hopfield.
0-9-0 Winter
Spring
EE/CS 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10 or their equivalents. Device, circuit and system techniques for the design of large-scale CMOS analog systems. The MOS transistor above and below threshold. Current mirrors. The differential transconductance amplifier. Analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation, division. Circuits with time constants: Linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain control. System examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to doing laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student is required to design a modest system-level project and submit it for fabrication. Third term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring

1987-1988

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10 or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring

1988-1989

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10 or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (l84a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1989-1990

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to devise, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (184a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1990-1991

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system-level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (l84a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1991-1992

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system-level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (184a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1992-1993

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In addition to laboratory work on elementary circuits, each student will design a modest system-level project and submit it for fabrication. Third-term laboratory is reserved for testing and evaluating these projects. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (184a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1993-1994

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In-depth laboratory work on elementary circuits and subsystems is an integral part of the course. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (184a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1994-1995

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. MOS transistor above and below threshold; current mirrors; differential transconductance amplifier; analog addition, subtraction, multiplication, absolute value, interpolation division. Circuits with time constants: linear filters of first and second order, monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. Automatic gain and control system examples from feedback control, vision, and auditory processing. In-depth laboratory work on elementary circuits and subsystems is an integral part of the course. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring
CNS/CS/EE 184 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Projects Laboratory
Prerequisite: CNS 182 abc; may be taken concurrently with CNS 182 bc. Design projects in large-scale analog integrated systems. Each student, or pair of students, is expected to define, design, verify, and submit for fabrication a system of their choice. The project definition and simulation must be finished by the end of the second quarter (184a), and the final design must be verified and submitted for fabrication by the end of the third quarter (184b). Testing and characterization of the fabricated circuits will be done in the first quarter of the following year (184c). A two-term version of the course can be made available by arrangement with the instructor. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Mead.
Units by arrangement. Fall
Winter
Spring

1995-1996

CNS/CS/EE 182 abc
Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Prerequisites: EE 14, EE 90, APh 3, CS 10, or their equivalents. Device physics, circuit, and system techniques for designing large-scale CMOS analog systems. Devices covered include the MOS transistor above and below threshold, the floating gate MOS transistor (including Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and hot electron injection), and silicon phototransducers (photodiodes and phototransistors). Static circuits studied include the current mirror, the differential pair, and the operational transconductance amplifier. Time-varying circuits studied include linear and nonlinear filters of first and second order, and monostable and astable relaxation oscillators. System examples from feedback control systems, vision, and audition. In-depth laboratory work on elementary circuits and subsystems is an integral part of the course. Instructor: Mead.
3-3-3 Fall
Winter
Spring